Lives Remembered

This many cases. That many deaths. More and more each day. If you don't know someone who's been sickened or killed by COVID-19, it can be easy to grow numb to these figures. But whole families and communities are grieving, and if we are to truly understand the toll this coronavirus has taken — and is taking — their stories need to be front and center. Each data point you hear about represents a human life whose loss is felt by countless other people. Here, we chronicle some of them.

If someone special to you has died of COVID-19, and you would like to share their story, please tell us about the person by filling out the form at the bottom of this page or emailing newstips@seattletimes.com with the subject line “Lives Remembered.”

Mark Riordan, 69
Tacoma

Mr. Riordan, who had Down syndrome and needed full-time care, idolized Elvis Presley and loved family, ferries, pizza, baseball cards and everything about Christmas. He also had style, wearing a tie most of the time because he loved getting dressed up, and always wearing a watch — the bigger the better — even though he couldn't tell time.
Read more >


Anita May “Anna” Wynalda, 66
Kennewick

Even though Ms. Wynalda was just 4-foot-11, “when she walked into a room, she stood 10 feet tall.” She always found time to help others, even with her busy schedule of working as a nurse during the day and as a Walmart cashier overnight. She fostered several children, helped connect immigrants with lawyers, and taught her children that “even if you don’t have a dollar, you can still offer a smile, or friendly or kind words.”
Read more >


Querubin “Sonny” Dizon Quitlong, 70
Seattle

Mr. Quitlong immigrated to the United States after serving in the Philippine Army. For decades, he worked as a checker at a Safeway on Rainier Avenue, and as a mail handler in Tukwila. He was known as a generous man, a helper. Thanksgivings at his South Seattle home were the stuff of legend, with upwards of 100 people trickling in and out, a mix of family, friends and folks with nowhere else to go.
Read more >


Leonard Sacharoff, 96
Bellevue

Mr. Sacharoff, who grew up in a New Jersey anarchist utopian community, fought in some of the most harrowing WWII battles with the 508th Parachute Infantry Regiment, including the Battle of the Bulge. He worked for 40 years as a quality control analyst in a Union Carbide plastics factory before moving to the Seattle area later in life and taking up marathon running. He was rarely seen without a smile on his face or a song in his heart.
Read more >


Edith "Edie" Irvine, 100
Seattle

Ms. Irvine had a sense of adventure and knack for making people feel special. She worked as a comptometer operator and bookkeeper for many Seattle businesses. She also won a battle for single women to be allowed to hold Seattle Yacht Club memberships. Ms. Irvine co-founded the Black Angus line of steakhouses with Stuart Anderson (the third of her five husbands, all of whom she outlived), but that was but one highlight in her long, colorful life.
Read more >


Charlie Burrell, 78
Bremerton / Seattle

Mr. Burrell worked at KCTS for decades and was well-respected by co-workers, who regarded him as a mentor and a champion of equal opportunities. He had a lifelong love of sports — having coached youth football and worked two Olympics for KCTS — but he didn't support any particular teams; when he watched the Super Bowl, he rooted for the underdog. He also was an avid music collector and always had music playing in his house.
Read more >


Harold “Lucky” Bourgoin, 97
Bellevue

Mr. Bourgoin never liked the name Harold, and “Lucky” just fit. After all, he lived for more than eight decades with a bullet lodged in the back of his head, was married for 73 years, was a world-class marksman, retired as a highly decorated lieutenant colonel in the Air Force after serving in three wars, and helped raise five successful sons.
Read more >


Dr. Joshua Yasuo Suzuki, 78
Shoreline / Edmonds

A quirky man with a jocular laugh, Dr. Suzuki was known to drive muscle cars, wear bow ties and suspenders, and practice Zen philosophy. He loved the mountains, where he would seek out mushrooms and wild flowers. As an OB/GYN at the Polyclinic, he delivered 5,000 babies and even befriended some of his patients.
Read more >


Douglas Roberts, 69
Vancouver

Mr. Roberts played college baseball, then coached his sons in soccer and Little League baseball. He was a high school teacher and coach before embarking in a long career in journalism and public relations. A serious and thoughtful man who was always striving to learn, he was a whiz at Scrabble and Trivial Pursuit.
Read more >


Hellyn Moore Pawula, 83
Des Moines

Ms. Moore Pawula was an acclaimed metal worker and jeweler who ran Highline Community College's jewelry program for nearly three decades. "She was happiest when she was teaching," said her daughter, whom Ms. Moore Pawula raised by herself while earning a master's degree at the University of Washington. She traveled abroad, giving lectures on her work and art history, and was a resident artist at a university in Greece. “I would like to instill an awareness that art is a total experience and not just an isolated incident,” she once said.
Read more >


Guadalupe “Lupe” Olivera, 60
Pasco

Mr. Olivera did the physically demanding work of a butcher at the Tyson Fresh Meats beef packaging plant. Before immigrating to the U.S., he's earned a master's degree in business management and accounting in Mexico, where he'd worked as a college professor and for a large company. His joys in life were traveling with his wife and his two beloved Chihuahuas, sending pictures to his seven grown children.
Read more >


Sandy Pratt, 92
Bellevue

Mr. Pratt was fascinated by the way the wind moved across the sail, pulling the craft through the water. He quickly learned to race sailboats, and was part of the racing fleet at the University of Washington, before putting his passion for aerodynamics to work in wing production as a manufacturing engineer at Boeing. He worked on a variety of wing designs, including the 747, for 38 years.
Read more >


Alan Lund, 81
Edmonds

Mr. Lund taught and directed music throughout the Seattle area for decades, nurturing a high level of performance from every player or singer and contributing a great deal to the region's music culture. When he and his wife became empty-nesters, they opened their home to a succession of people facing homelessness, cancer and marital breakup.
Read more >


Helen Molina, 85
Seattle

Ms. Molina was small in stature but had a big heart when it came to her family and Washington Huskies athletics. She was known as a dedicated and dependable employee of the UW sports department, and after she retired, she volunteered for 25 years at Lynndale Elementary School. Ms. Molina was also passionate about long-distance running. As former UW basketball coach Lorenzo Romar put it: "Some people leave an impression, and she did."
Read more >


Jerry Spring, 85
Kent

Enthralled by flight from an early age, Mr. Spring became a pilot during the golden age of aviation in the 1960s. His desire to see things from a different vantage point — along with his Christian faith — drove many aspects of his life, from traveling the world with his wife, Joan, to helping people experiencing homelessness. The Spring family's experience when Mr. Spring got sick encouraged his daughter to raise money to place tablets into COVID-19 isolation rooms so loved ones can have video calls with patients.
Read more >


Tom Delucchi, 69
Richland

Mr. Delucchi was a welding engineer at the Hanford Site who loved to tinker in the machine shop in his garage. He was always willing to help on projects large or small — once, he even helped his brother-in-law design a windmill system to power an off-the-grid home in Alaska. He also built clocks and two functional steam engines. He loved opera and boysenberry pie. Mr Delucchi and his wife of 47 years raised a daughter whose soccer games he rarely missed.
Read more >


Esther Bryant Kyles and Edwin Kyles Jr., 64 and 75
Renton

Pastor and Mrs. Kyles found joy in generosity, giving time and money to those in need. Together, they infused a mission of service into their small Renton ministry. Mrs. Kyles, who worked for Washington State Ferries, had a hearty laugh and a listening ear, providing friends and family a reliable source of comfort. Pastor Kyles served in Vietnam for the U.S. Army and worked for Boeing for more than 15 years before becoming a full-time pastor. He was known to have a gentle and thoughtful nature.
Read more >


Bobby Lee Barber, 84
Buckley

Mr. Barber loved people, his family and Seattle’s sports teams. Known to friends as Bugs or Bugsy, he became a Seahawks season-ticket holder during the team’s inaugural season, was a longtime Husky football season-ticket holder who went to a few Rose Bowls, and loved going to Mariners games. He and his wife, Grace, were married for 64 years.
Read more >


Clair "Toby" Dunlap, 89
Edmonds

Mr. Dunlap lived his dream and then some. An aviation enthusiast from age 5, he bought his first plane at 16 and later spent 36 years as a pilot, once flying John F. Kennedy on his presidential campaign. He was still teaching people how to fly at 88. A dedicated father to his four children, Mr. Dunlap kept scorecards from family baseball games for more than two decades.
Read more >


Susie Chin Lee, Willa Lee and Regina Lim Lee, 82, 60 and 58
Everett

Regina worked in a call center for Costco Travel. Willa was a trainer at a biomedical company. They shared a home with their mother, Susie, who had been a housekeeper. The Lee family, including two surviving brothers, was last all together to celebrate the Chinese New Year, sharing favorite dishes such as steamed minced pork, black beans and spare ribs. "They were loving and they lived life to the fullest," says Raymond Lee, who recalls riding bikes with his sisters and brother when they were growing up on Seattle's Beacon Hill.
Read more >


David Beyl, 85
Mercer Island

A piece of land in Antarctica is named after Cmdr. Beyl, in recognition of his time on the continent during one of several tours abroad with the Navy. He and his wife of 61 years, Sandra, had three daughters, and he would write to them in perfect cursive when he was away. In his retirement, he found a second career as a woodworker.
Read more >


Cornelius “Moose” Lawyer, 84
Bellevue

Those who knew Mr. Lawyer best called him “Moose” or “Grandpa Moose.” He was the first in his family to go to college, earning a master's degree in chemistry and working as a research scientist and at a cancer research foundation before transitioning into technical sales, which led him to Brussels. He stayed there nearly two decades and coached several Little League teams to the European Championships. He also loved to sing and had a strong baritone.
Read more >


Cora Howard, 77
Seattle

Ms. Howard was known as someone who embodied selflessness and demanded excellence from everyone — even complete strangers. She taught elementary school for 23 years and raised seven children with her husband, Theodore. Her admirers said her greatest strength as an educator was the care she took with students who were struggling.
Read more >


Rocco Ursino, 90
Bellevue

Mr. Ursino loved being Italian. Whenever he felt blue, he’d strap on an apron and make spaghetti sauce. He and his wife of 64 years dedicated their lives to raising their seven children. Mr. Ursino was social and outgoing to the extreme, adding close friends to his ever-expanding circle throughout his life. He was a regular at Borracchini's Bakery in Rainier Valley, and he kept a weekly tee time with three Italian American friends he'd known for more than half a century.
Read more >


Carole Rae Woodmansee, 81
Mount Vernon

Throughout her life, Ms. Woodmansee was known to always put others first. In her final days, speaking by telephone to her children from her Mount Vernon hospital bed, Ms. Woodmansee reassured them, telling them she wasn’t afraid and that she was praying for them all. She quoted her favorite hymn, “Blessed Assurance”: “This is my story, this is my song / Praising my Savior, all the day long.” “That so was my mom,” said her son, Joe Woodmansee. “That’s who she was.”
Read more >


James Simpson, 28
Burien

At 5-foot-9 and more than 300 pounds, Mr. Simpson was a gentle giant. He grew up in foster care and found a calling counseling youths. “He just wanted to be that voice for kids,” said his cousin Chezere Braley, “someone the kids could trust, confide in confidently without being judged.” He was exposed to the coronavirus while working at a Burien mental-health center where eight of the 15 residents tested positive. Before he got sick, he shared concerns with his sister about how his employer was handling the outbreak.
Read more >


Leo Sreebny, 98
Seattle

Dr. Sreebny was the son of Jewish immigrants from Ukraine. When medical school quotas for Jews kept him out, he became a dentist instead, and eventually established a dental research center at UW. Dr. Sreebny always tried to coax a smile out of those he met, and he kept the family home filled with music.
Read more >


Petra Karr, 60
Burien

Ms. Karr emphasized the “community” in community theater, going out of her way to invite people — especially young people she thought could use some help — into the group experience. She and her husband, Chris, founded ACT 1 Theatre Productions. She had been in the hospital for cancer treatments in March when she was diagnosed with COVID-19.
Read more >


Thomas Lopez, 44
Pacific

Mr. Lopez ran a fleet of Tacos El Tajin food trucks around Seattle. He made national headlines in 2017 for hawking tacos out of his food truck on Interstate 5 after a semi truck rolled over and brought traffic to a standstill.
Read more >


Steve Shulman, 67
Seattle

Steve was a longtime grocer and community figure at Leschi Market along Lake Washington. Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan said he “was the heartbeat of Leschi – he knew everyone, what wine they loved and how they were doing in their lives.”
Read more >


Delores "Dee" and Merle Tofte, 85 and 86
Vancouver

The Toftes met in a Portland music club called The Grove. They loved to sing together, and performed at local lodges and on cruises as “Dee and Mee,” with Ms. Tofte on keyboards and Mr. Tofte on his guitar. After 52 years of marriage, the Toftes died in separate rooms of the same hospital, within hours of each other. They were buried side by side in their matching pajamas.
Read more >


Hoang Dinh Nguyen, 72
Issaquah

Mr. Nguyen survived war in Vietnam, a harrowing escape by boat, two strokes and cancer. “No matter what adversity he faced, he always found a way to push through it,” son Viet — one of nine children — said of a father he described as quiet and kind. Mr. Nguyen worked the berry fields of South King and Pierce counties, and later manufacturing and construction. He loved growing bonsai trees and taking care of animals, and daughter Crystal said he could build anything.
Read more >


Douglas Lambrecht, 71
Kirkland

Mr. Lambrecht was a longtime emergency-room doctor at Valley Medical Center in Renton. He became one of the first people in the U.S. to die of COVID-19. A month later, his son Nathan wrote a letter to President Donald Trump about his family's loss, rebuking the administration for what he saw as inaction and carelessness.
Read more >


Kenneth Robert Hunt, 86
Seattle

Mr. Hunt was “a fixture” at Seattle-area sports events and loved to cheer for Seattle Prep, Villa Academy, Tottenham Hotspur, the Sounders and the Seahawks. While at Cornell University, where he was a member of the Chi Psi fraternity, Mr. Hunt was an NCAA wrestling champion and the only wrestler to beat Princeton’s Donald Rumsfeld, who would go on to twice serve as U.S. Secretary of Defense.
Read more >


Elizabeth and Robert Mar, 72 and 78
Seattle

Ms. Mar was the beloved matriarch of the local classic Hawaiian restaurant Kona Kitchen. She embodied the deeply kind and ever-welcoming spirit of aloha, daughter Angie Okumoto says. Ms. Mar went by Liz, but many patrons simply called her “Auntie” or “Grandma.” Mr. Mar died the day after his wife. They leave behind a family that includes seven grandchildren.
Read more >


Bill Chambers, 97
Kirkland

Mr. Chambers served in World War II, driving an armored bulldozer to build roads as the front advanced across Europe. After the war, he put his road-building skills to work for King County 30 years as the suburbs grew. He and his wife, Barbara Jean, raised five children in Carnation.
Read more >


Scott Ryan, 41
Snohomish County

Mr. Ryan had worked as a driver at Community Transit since 2015, after years driving an armored truck. As a shop steward, he fought for his co-workers; when the coronavirus began to spread, he and other drivers pushed Community Transit for more precautions to protect drivers from being exposed. Mr. Ryan leaves behind his wife, Heather, and three kids.
Read more >


Samina Hameed, 59
Lynnwood

Ms. Hameed is the first King County Metro driver who is known to have died of COVID-19. Her co-workers said she could always turn a bad day around with the warmth of her smile. Her husband is also a Metro operator; they have three children and a daughter-in-law.
Read more >


Stephen Schwartz, 78
Seattle

Dr. Schwartz was a well-known University of Washington pathologist and vocal participant in faculty discussions about university politics. He “is rightfully considered a giant amongst investigators of the biology of smooth muscle cells and the structure of blood vessels,” UW Medicine CEO Paul Ramsey wrote.
Read more >


Twilla Morin, 85
Kirkland

Ms. Morin had been a bookkeeper and day trader. She died at Life Care Center of Kirkland, where one-quarter of the residents died of COVID-19 within a month, becoming the nation's first known cluster of deaths from the virus. Her daughter sued the nursing home's parent company in April.
Read more >


The Rev. Dr. Andrea Bowman, 73
Ellensburg

Rev. Bowman was an educator, a school board member, a woman of God, a colleague and a friend. On Palm Sunday, she became the first Kittitas County resident to die from complications related to COVID-19.
Read more >